Right Relations Policy

Dear Summer Institute Friends,

In 2016, with your help and input, our Summer Institute adopted a new Covenant statement. (See http://omdsi.camp9.org/Summer-Institute-Covenant) In this statement, we also called for the creation of a reconciliation process to help us “make our way back into covenant” when we fall out of relationship.

During the past few months, the SI Committee on Ministry (formerly called the Strategic Planning Team), has been working with the SIPC and the SI Ministry Team to create that process. The result is a Right Relations Policy that will help us live our SI Covenant and reconcile when we are out of covenant. We want to share this Right Relations Policy with you all. The full policy can be found at: http://omdsi.org/about/summer-institute-right-relations-policy/ and a slightly edited version is printed below.

If you have questions about this policy, please let us know at: sicom@omdsi.org. Our plan is to review the policy as it is implemented this first year, gather feedback, and modify as needed. We look forward to being with you all at Summer Institute 2017 as we live and celebrate our intentional, intergenerational UU community.

With Blessings for the Journey,

 

Members of the SI Committee on Ministry (SICoM)

David Strickler (chair)

Cindy Frantz

Becky Dempster

Alan Halperin

Rev. Joan Van Becelaere

Gina Phillips (SIPC Liaison)

 

Summer Institute Right Relations Policy

We value compassion, so we promise that when any of us are out of covenant we will provide and participate in reconciliation processes so we can make our way back into covenant.

  • SI Covenant, adopted July 19, 2016

Background

Summer Institute is an intergenerational community of Unitarian Universalists who gather together one week each summer for fellowship, fun, and spiritual growth. Many attendees find that SI is a transformative experience; however, conflicts and breaches of covenant will inevitably arise on occasion. The SI Committee on Ministry (SICoM) has created this policy to insure the integrity of our community and to provide processes through which right relations can be restored.

Scope

This policy applies to situations of interpersonal conflict within the SI community and when SI community members break the SI Covenant. It applies to all members of the SI community.  More specific policies may be written for specific segments of the SI community (e.g. the Youth or Young Adult communities).  

Right Relations Process

In case of emergency or imminent physical harm, call 911 immediately, and then contact a member of the Ministry team or an SIPC member.

During SI, primary responsibility for implementing this policy lies with the Ministry team.  However, not all issues can be resolved during SI.  In this case, The SI Committee on Ministry and the CER Primary Contact will be responsible for managing the ongoing process.

The first step in most conflict situations is that individuals in conflict will attempt to resolve the issue themselves, as appropriate.  If an SI attendee has a concern that cannot be addressed by talking directly with the individual(s) involved, they should contact a member of the Ministry Team or a member of the appropriate leadership group (SIPC, SI Young Adult Panel, or SI Youth Panel), who will take it to the Ministry team.

The SI community recognizes that systems of power and oppression have an impact on how conflicts get expressed, labeled and resolved.  Our covenant calls on us to “model and respect healthy boundaries, so that our diverse community is safe for all.” In maintaining right relations, this means paying attention to power differentials and the effect they may have on conflict, and seeking out opportunities to provide support to those in traditionally marginalized identities.  

During SI, the Ministry Team is responsible for evaluating the situation and identifying the resources and/or processes most appropriate for resolution.  Resources and tools include, but are not limited to:

  • Pastoral care
  • Natural pre-existing support systems such as family and friends.
  • Mediation:  Mediation assumes that both parties are on equal moral ground and are in dispute over alternative goods or alternative points of view. The focus is to create mutual understanding and a new point of agreement or common ground.
  • Restorative Justice Circles:  The Restorative Justice process can be used to bring conflicting parties back into the community rather than to punish the affected persons.  The task is to bring the the affected person(s) and the community into the process of establishing restitution via Justice Circles and thereby bring the community back to harmony. The criterion for initiating a Justice Circle whether the affected people want to use this process.      
  • Law enforcement and College Security  
  • Mental health services: Local emergency mental health services may be appropriate in extreme circumstances.

Roles

Ministry team:  In many cases, the Ministry team will serve as the primary point of contact. They will identify the process most appropriate to the situation, and either facilitate that process or refer the affected persons to the Restorative Justice Coordinator.

Summer Institute Planning Council (SIPC) members may also be the initial point of contact.  They will then refer people to the Ministry team or directly to the Restorative Justice Coordinator.

SI Youth Panel (SIYP) members may be the initial point of contact. They may then refer people to the Ministry team or directly to the Restorative Justice Coordinator.

SI Young Adult Panel (SIYAP) members may be the initial point of contact.  They may then refer people to the Ministry team or directly to the Restorative Justice Coordinator.

The Restorative Justice Coordinator assists with starting Justice Circles as requested and monitors the progress of all active Circles.    

The Restorative Justice Coach is CER Staff Member who provides advice to the Restorative Justice Coordinator and Circle Facilitators.  

The SICoM will provide contact information for SIPC members and the Ministry team so that attendees can easily contact someone if necessary.  The SICoM will contact people with appropriate training in the processes referenced in this policy, and establish a contact list of those willing to be on call for the Ministry team.  The committee will also provide the Ministry team with a list of location-specific resources (updated yearly).  The SICoM serves as a resource to the Ministry team during SI, and oversees any ongoing processes that extend beyond the week of SI.  The committee also ensures ongoing communication between the Ministry team, the CER Primary Contact, and SIPC as appropriate.  This committee also has primary responsibility for evaluating and reviewing this policy periodically.

CER Primary Contact for SI.  The Regional Primary Contact is the designated representative for the Central East Region of the UUA.  The Primary Contact should be informed and involved with legal and insurance issues that require the involvement of the Central East Region.

Confidentiality

The Ministry team, SIPC, SIYAP, SIYP, and SICoM will maintain common standards of confidentiality, as appropriate to the situation.  Excepting mandatory reporting requirements and similar situations, the identity of individuals involved with the Ministry team and right relations processes will be kept confidential.  

Assessment of Right Relations Policy

Ministry team members will fill out a feedback form each day summarizing the number of incidents and basic kinds of pastoral care provided during SI.  

Only members of the SICoM and the Ministry team will have access to the raw data.  SICoM is responsible for summarizing and interpreting the data, making changes to the Right Relations Policy as appropriate, and making recommendations to the SIPC and Ministry team as appropriate.

SICoM will review the Right Relations Policy annually and revise it based on the feedback.

 

Appendix A:  SI 2017 Right Relations personnel

 

Ministry Team

Rev. Michelle Buhite
Rev. Lane Campbell
Rev. Dave Clements
Melissa Jeter
Rev. Elaine Strawn
Lori Fatchet-McGee (Coordinator)

 

Restorative Justice
Scott Piepho (Coordinator)
Rev.  Renee Ruchotzke (CER Staff advisor, on site part-time during SI 2017)
Rev. Evin Carvill-Ziemer (CER staff advisor, available by phone during SI 2017)  

The RJ Coordinator will have the list of Circle facilitators who are trained and available.  

 

SI Planning Council(SIPC)
Gina Phillips (Chair)
Bruce Kent (Vice-chair)
Carol Dobbins
Dan Flippo
Krissy Brannan
Linda Fleming
Lois Weir
Lori Fatchet-McGee

 

SI Young Adult Panel
Caitlin Ballinger (Chair)
Nikki Hurlbut (Co-Chair)
Dalin Franz
Ryan Haker
Ashera Buhite
Henry McNabb (YA Chaplain)
Chelsea Jordan (YA Chaplain)

 

SI Youth Panel
Dave Gill (Adult Co-Chair)
Chris Hurlbut (Adult Co-Chair)
Lauren Straubhaar (Adult Co-Chair)
Alan Kerns (Youth Co-Chair)
Arielle Swinehart (Youth Co-Chair)
Tucker Phillips
Gavin Vanwinkle Bright
Jimmy Moore
Trecia Clinton
Katie Uhgrin
Kat Hawbaker (Adult Chaplain for Youth)
Claire Gill (Youth Chaplain)
Jackson Rudoff (Youth Chaplain)

 

CER Primary Contact for SI
Rev. Joan Van Becelaere

 

 

Appendix B:  Emergency Contact Information

Oberlin Police Department:  440 774 1061
Oberlin Fire Department  440 774 3211
Oberlin College Safety and Security 440 775 8911
Allen Memorial Hospital  440 775 1211

Packing and Scooters and Peek!

It’s almost here! Summer Institute is less than a month away. We hope you’re excited. We certainly are. We’re excited, and we’re here to help. We’ve got a few things to tell you, to make your trip easier, so let’s get started.

Many you are asking about the packing list. We have one, but somehow, things stayed on the list that were no longer necessary, and somethings never made the list. Well, we’ve updated the list. It can be found by clicking this link: http://omdsi.camp9.org/page-620551. Remember, these are only suggestions. It’s your week, what you bring is up to you.

There’s one thing on the list that confuses some people. We suggest that you bring a PEEK! prize, with a reusable grocery bag. Unless you’ve been to Summer Institute, you may not know what PEEK! is.

PEEK! is a card-and-dice game where there are no losers, and everybody wins a prize. It was invented by Sam Hens-Greco’s Uncle Carl, and Sam, along with his wife, Kathryn, and his two daughters, Kaitlyn and Eliza, present it on Thursday night. To play, all you do is roll the dice, and turn over a card that represents the number you rolled. Everyone around the table has a prize under their chair, and if you win a round by turning over your cards fastest, you can peek at everyone else’s prize, and trade yours for one. At the end of the evening, everyone gets to look at their prize. There’s one important rule – you must take your prize. You can trade it with someone, you can give it away, but the prize must leave the building at the end. You can always hang on to it, and bring it back next year.

But what, I hear you asking, are the prizes like? Well, they tend to be small, can be new and inexpensive, can be gently used, and should be heartfelt, or at least be something you want out of the house. They should be small enough that they fit in the reusable grocery bag (Sam wants to do away with paper), so no one can see them during the game. At the end, if nothing else, you can keep the grocery bag.

Oberlin is not a large campus, but there is enough distance and walking involved that you should be aware of it. We do run golf carts, which you can catch along the route, which is marked on the map in your registration kit. You can also call the golf carts using the number found on the scheduled. However, they do not run at all times. If you need it, we recommend that you rent a personal scooter. Call NPL Homecare in Elyria, OH at 440-365-8581, ask for Cody or Ashley, and tell them this is for Summer Institute, 7/9-15. Cal Frye, our golf cart head, will be picking them up on 7/7, and returning them on 7/17. If you have a financial need around personal mobility issues, please contact Lois Weir: locavorelois@gmail.com. There are funds in the scholarship fund that we can make available to those who have mobility issues and financial need.

We hope this is helpful. If you have any additional questions, there will be an email sent out on July 1 to those who are registered, giving you the final details that you’ll need (assigned sleeping quarter, morning seminar, etc.). You can also email me at brucekent1782@gmail.com and I’ll try to answer your questions. On behalf of the SIPC, I look forward to seeing all of you there.

Bruce Kent

Assistant Chair, Summer Institute Planning Council

 

An Opportunity to Learn and Serve

Here’s an Exciting Training and Service Opportunity!

 

The Summer Institute Planning Council is looking for people interested in learning more about how a Restorative Justice Circle works, and how to co-facilitate one.

If you would like more information about Restorative Justice before learning more, I invite you to check out our introduction here: http://omdsi.org/news/blog/introduction-to-restorative-justice/.

We are excited to be offering a training and service opportunity to you in the very near future. The training will be held on Saturday, July 8th, that’s the day before SI starts, right on the campus of Oberlin. The training will be lead by Reverends Evin Carvill-Ziermer and Renee Rutchotzke and will be from 1:30-7:30. A pizza dinner will be provided. We will ask that trainees be willing to be in a pool of available circle facilitators should the Restorative Justice team need them during SI, and also that adult trainees attend the morning theme talks.

The only cost to you would be the cost of the additional night in your room, if you choose to stay overnight. This is $25 for a standard room, a little more for AC rooms and apartments.

Training is open to youth who will be in the youth program and adults. We will be putting together a group of trainees based on our needs for each age group.  So if you are interested, please send an email to me at ginaphillips224@gmail.com with a note about who you are, whether you are a youth, young adult, or adult, and what interests you about this opportunity. Please let me know if you are interested by June 14th.

Can’t wait to hear from you!

Gina Phillips, SIPC Chair

Join us!

Register now to join this great looking group of people!

Do it by Thursday and save $75

http://omdsi.org/category/year-specific/2017/

Register soon!

Remember, the price for registering goes up by $75 on Thursday!

http://omdsi.org/category/year-specific/2017/

 

Save money, register soon!

Remember that after June 1 (2 weeks!), the price of registration goes up $75. So sign up now and come join us!

(more…)

Summer Institute Right Relations Policy

We value compassion, so we promise that when any of us are out of covenant we will provide and participate in reconciliation processes so we can make our way back into covenant.

  • SI Covenant, adopted July 19,  2016

Background

Summer Institute is an intergenerational community of Unitarian Universalists who gather together one week each summer for fellowship, fun, and spiritual growth. Many attendees find that SI is a transformative experience; however, conflicts and breaches of covenant will inevitably arise on occasion. The SI Committee on Ministry (SICoM) has created this policy to insure the integrity of our community and to provide processes through which right relations can be restored.

Scope

This policy applies to situations of interpersonal conflict within the SI community and when SI community members break the SI Covenant. It applies to all members of the SI community.  More specific policies may be written for specific segments of the SI community (e.g. the Youth or Young Adult communities).

Right Relations Process

In case of emergency or imminent physical harm, call 911 immediately, and then contact a member of the Ministry team or an SIPC member.

During SI, primary responsibility for implementing this policy lies with the Ministry team.  However, not all issues can be resolved during SI.  In this case, The SI Committee on Ministry and the CER Primary Contact will be responsible for managing the ongoing process.

The first step in most conflict situations is that individuals in conflict will attempt to resolve the issue themselves, as appropriate.  If an SI attendee has a concern that cannot be addressed by talking directly with the individual(s) involved, they should contact a member of the Ministry Team or a member of the appropriate leadership group (SIPC, SI Young Adult Panel, or SI Youth Panel), who will take it to the Ministry team.

The SI community recognizes that systems of power and oppression have an impact on how conflicts get expressed, labeled and resolved.  Our covenant calls on us to “model and respect healthy boundaries, so that our diverse community is safe for all.” In maintaining right relations, this means paying attention to power differentials and the effect they may have on conflict, and seeking out opportunities to provide support to those in traditionally marginalized identities.

During SI, the Ministry Team is responsible for evaluating the situation and identifying the resources and/or processes most appropriate for resolution.  Resources and tools include, but are not limited to:

  • Pastoral care
  • Natural pre-existing support systems such as family and friends.
  • Mediation:  Mediation assumes that both parties are on equal moral ground and are in dispute over alternative goods or alternative points of view. The focus is to create mutual understanding and a new point of agreement or common ground.
  • Restorative Justice Circles:  The Restorative Justice process can be used to bring conflicting parties back into the community rather than to punish the affected persons.  The task is to bring the the affected person(s) and the community into the process of establishing restitution via Justice Circles and thereby bring the community back to harmony. The criterion for initiating a Justice Circle whether the affected people want to use this process.
  • Law enforcement and College Security
  • Mental health services: Local emergency mental health services may be appropriate in extreme circumstances.

 

Roles

Ministry team:  In many cases, the Ministry team will serve as the primary point of contact. They will identify the process most appropriate to the situation, and either facilitate that process or refer the affected persons to the Restorative Justice Coordinator.

Summer Institute Planning Council (SIPC) members may also be the initial point of contact.  They will then refer people to the Ministry team or directly to the Restorative Justice Coordinator.

SI Youth Panel (SIYP) members may be the initial point of contact. They may then refer people to the Ministry team or directly to the Restorative Justice Coordinator.

SI Young Adult Panel (SIYAP) members may be the initial point of contact.  They may then refer people to the Ministry team or directly to the Restorative Justice Coordinator.

The Restorative Justice Coordinator assists with starting Justice Circles as requested and monitors the progress of all active Circles.

The Restorative Justice Coach is CER Staff Member who provides advice to the Restorative Justice Coordinator and Circle Facilitators.

The SICoM will provide contact information for SIPC members and the Ministry team so that attendees can easily contact someone if necessary.  The SICoM will contact people with appropriate training in the processes referenced in this policy, and establish a contact list of those willing to be on call for the Ministry team.  The committee will also provide the Ministry team with a list of location-specific resources (updated yearly).  The SICoM serves as a resource to the Ministry team during SI, and oversees any ongoing processes that extend beyond the week of SI.  The committee also ensures ongoing communication between the Ministry team, the CER Primary Contact, and SIPC as appropriate.  This committee also has primary responsibility for evaluating and reviewing this policy periodically.

CER Primary Contact for SI.

The Regional Primary Contact is the designated representative for the Central East Region of the UUA.  The Primary Contact should be informed and involved with legal and insurance issues that require the involvement of the Central East Region.

 

Confidentiality

The Ministry team, SIPC, SIYAP, SIYP, and SICoM will maintain common standards of confidentiality, as appropriate to the situation.  Excepting mandatory reporting requirements and similar situations, the identity of individuals involved with the Ministry team and right relations processes will be kept confidential.

Assessment of Right Relations Policy

Ministry team members will fill out a feedback form each day summarizing the number of incidents and basic kinds of pastoral care provided during SI (add Document  name or Appendix or link?).

Only members of the SICoM and the Ministry team will have access to the raw data.  SICoM is responsible for summarizing and interpreting the data, making changes to the Right Relations Policy as appropriate, and making recommendations to the SIPC and Ministry team as appropriate.

SICoM will review the Right Relations Policy annually and revise it based on the feedback.

 

Appendix A:  SI 2017 Right Relations personnel

Ministry Team
Rev. Scott Rudolph
Rev. Elaine Strawn
Rev. Dave Clements
Rev. Michelle Buhite
Rev. Lane Campbell

Restorative Justice
Scott Piepho (Coordinator)
Rev.  Renee Ruchotzke (CER Staff advisor, on site part-time during SI 2017)
Rev. Evin Carvill-Ziemer (CER staff advisor, available by phone during SI 2017)
The RJ Coordinator will have the list of Circle facilitators who are trained and available.

SI Planning Council(SIPC)
Gina Phillips (Chair)
Bruce Kent (Vice-chair)
Carol Dobbins
Dan Flippo
Krissy Brannan
Linda Fleming
Lois Weir
Lori Fatchet-McGee

SI Young Adult Panel
Caitlin Ballinger (Chair)
Nikki Hurlbut (Co-Chair)
To be determined  (YA Chaplain)

SI Youth Panel
Dave Gill (Adult Co-Chair)
Chris Hurlbut (Adult Co-Chair)
Lauren Straubhaar (Adult Co-Chair)

Alan Kerns (Youth Co-Chair)
Arielle Swinehart (Youth Co-Chair)
Tucker Phillips
Gavin Vanwinkle Bright
Jimmy Moore
Trecia Clinton
Katie Uhgrin

Kat Hawbaker (Adult Chaplain for Youth)
Claire Gill (Youth Chaplain)
Jackson Rudoff (Youth Chaplain)

CER Primary Contact for SI
Rev. Joan Van Becelaere

Appendix B:  Emergency Contact Information

Oberlin Police Department:  440 774 1061
Oberlin Fire Department  440 774 3211
Oberlin College Safety and Security 440 775 8911
Allen Memorial Hospital  440 775 1211

Summer Institute registration opens at midnight, April 1

No, this isn’t a cruel April fools joke. You really can register for Summer Institute 2017 on April 1st!

2017 Programming

Estimate Costs

Scholarship Applications

Register Here!

Help Wanted! Apply Within!

Summer Institute is looking for a few good people to provide service and leadership in critical areas for making SI run. If you are interested in putting your skills and passion to work to make the community work, now is the time!

In furtherance of our goal of making Summer Institute more accessible to more people, and our operations more transparent, we are opening up some community leadership positions to an application process. If you have done one of these job in the past and would like to do so again, please apply! If you have not but are interest in starting, please apply!

See below for a list of positions we need to fill for this coming July’s SI, and the campership value of each. PLEASE NOTE: These positions are different from, and in addition to, the workshift positions that each attendee is asked to do. Workshifts are one time jobs, the below are done throughout the week. You are welcome to apply for more than one, although you will only be selected for one. Feel free to note your preference on your application if you apply for several.

Application deadline is April 15th, so please apply soon! If you are applying for a position and still want to register now, please do not pay for your registration until you are notified regarding your position application. If you are asked to fill a position, you will be notified via email and provided with a campership number to give to the registration team. Remember, April 15th! Taxes and SI, together at last. One is fun, the other less so. I’ll let you decided which you think is which.

See below for the positions and details. Go here to apply:

Service Position Application

Job TitleJob DescriptionApplicant RequirementsCampership Value 2017
Newsletter EditorExcept for Sunday, the Osiris will be 2 pages, front and back of an 8½ x 11 sheet and will only feature the news and announcements that someone would need if they can’t or don’t use the internet. News will be gathered by the editor in the following ways: 1 – A drop box will be located in the cafeteria at night and in the morning. The editor will pick up any submissions after breakfast. 2 – An email address will be maintained for the editor. 3 – The editor will be responsible for monitoring the various sites and apps that the SIPC is using, and extracting the information that non-smart phone users need, and publishing it. The newsletter will be put together in the morning. The editor is then responsible for getting it to the printer, located across the street from Hale gymnasium, having 100 copies printed, picking them up and getting them to the dining hall for dinner.Strong written communication skills. Newsletter formatting experience a plus.Tier 2 – $375
Golf Cart DriverProvide transporation around campus for those with limited mobility challenges (those with significant challenges are recommended to get a personal mobility device). Work is coordinated in shifts and most shifts are at times between major time blocks. Early morning and/or late night hours required.Valid drivers license;must have or obtain a current background check on record with the UUATier 3 – $225
Lead Vespers Child Care ProviderProvide child care for ages 3-9 during vespers each weekday. Coordinate and lead workshift volunteers for vespers childcare. Must have or obtain a current (within the last three years) background check through the UUA.Experience caring for children. Must have or obtain a current background check on record with the UUATier 3 – $225
Assistant photo curator / Specific event photographerTake photos at specific events (coordinated with the lead photo curator). Assist the lead photo curator with editing of community-submitted photos for slide show.Experience in photography and slideshow creation.Tier 2 – $375
Community recorder (photo, video)Take video and photos at SI and collect from the community via Slack/email/social media. Create the Community Video, which will be shared with congregations in CER for promotion of future Summer Institutes.Experience in videography and video editing.Tier 3 – $225
Nursery / Preschool Care with Religious Education ProgramOur children’s program offers a variety of activities specially designed for the children to create their own Summer Institute experiences. Our RE teachers are responsible for the children from after morning worship (must leave worship 10 minutes early to be ready for class) until lunch time. There is also a teachers meeting and an open house for parents on Sunday that are mandatory. We ask that you communicate with your teaching partner in order to plan appropriate activities, before SI. We have almost every craft supply available known to man. There are 2 teachers assigned to each grade level. Most of all, you would be responsible for making memories! We encourage children and adults to participate fully and to treat one another and their environment with respect.Experience caring for small children. Must have or obtain a current background check on file with the UUA.Tier 1 – $455
RE Teacher grades K-6Our children’s program offers a variety of activities specially designed for the children to create their own Summer Institute experiences. Our RE teachers are responsible for the children from after morning worship( must leave worship 10 minutes early to be ready for class) until lunch time. There is also a teachers meeting and an open house for parents on Sunday that are mandatory. We ask that you communicate with your teaching partner in order to plan appropriate activities, before SI. We have almost every craft supply available known to man. There are 2 teachers assigned to each grade level. Most of all, you would be responsible for making memories! We encourage children and adults to participate fully and to treat one another and their environment with respect.Experience work with and/or teaching elementary aged children preferred. Must have or obtain a current background check on file with the UUATier 1 – $455
Triage Nurse Team LeadTriage the situation; communicate with campers and SIPC as applicable, document according to insurance requirements, maintain a log book for interactions with campers. At least one member of the nursing team must be available at all times during SI. *NOTE a more extensive document detailing the responsibilities and qualfications of the nursing team is available upon request and will be supplied to all members of the team prior to SIEither an RN or LPN licensed in the state of Ohio. Be able to work effectively as a team member. Understand and respect each camper’s right to information privacy and also documentation requirements. Must have or obtain a current background check on file with the UUA.Tier 1 – $455
Triage NurseTriage the situation; communicate with campers and SIPC as applicable, document according to insurance requirements, maintain a log book for interactions with campers. At least one member of the nursing team must be available at all times during SI. *NOTE a more extensive document detailing the responsibilities and qualfications of the nursing team is available upon request and will be supplied to all members of the team prior to SIMust have a minimum of current First Aid and CPR certifications. Be able to work effectively as a team member. Understand and respect each camper’s right to information privacy and also documentation requirements. Must have or obtain a current background check through the UUA.Tier 1 – $455
Children’s Vespers LeaderPlan and lead vespers services/activities for children aged 9 through youth. Services take place at the same time as adult vespers.Must have or obtain a current background check through the UUA.Tier 2 – $375
Dr. WhUU Assistant Leader (Religious Education position)DR WhUU and wibbly wobbly fun!
Looking for someone to help have futuristic, time traveling fun, helping with our afternoon Dr WhUU workshop for children.
Must be familiar with Dr. Who fandom, working with kids, and be creative. Must be able to help Monday thru Friday during the early afternoon workshop time. Must have or obtain a current background check through the UUA.Tier 3- $225
Sneak Peek at the 2017 T-Shirts!

This year’s t-shirts have been finalized! Let’s extend a big thank you to Nikki Hurlbut for coming up with this beautiful design.

The picture is not deceiving you: we will be offering women’s shirts in addition to unisex and children’s!

There will also be a limited quantity of white shirts available in the bookstore for tie-dye purposes.

Congratulations Rabbi Horowitz

Congratulations to Rabbi David Horowitz, two-time Summer Institute theme speaker,who was honored last month in Akron. He was awarded the Tikkun Olam Award at the Campus Gala of the Schultz Campus for Jewish Life. The video made in his honor can be seen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oca_nR7V2EA

Seeking 2017 T-Shirt Designs!

It’s that time of the year! No, not that thing with the carols… it’s time for us to ask our wonderful, talented community for designs for the Summer Institute 2017 t-shirt!

As a reminder, the SI 2017 theme is “Beyond Lip Service: The Courage to Communicate UU Values.”

What do you get for designing the t-shirt? This year, you will receive TWO free t-shirts. You could get one t-shirt for you and one for a friend, or two for you – one colored, and one white for tie-dye! (Or you could give BOTH of them away – it’s entirely up to you what you want to do with them.) More importantly, you will have the pleasure of seeing your artwork on everyone’s backs while at SI 2017 (and, knowing us, years to come).

Please send all submissions and questions to kebrannan@gmail.com by February 19th, 2017. We can’t wait to see what you come up with!

New Year (almost), New Camperships

Hello SI’ers! As the weather has made a very sudden turn to winter, let’s all distract ourselves with thoughts of Summer!

If you submitted a workshop or seminar proposal, you probably noticed that there were some new names for camperships. This year the Summer Institute Planning Council is trying something new. Instead of the traditional “half camperships” and “full camperships” that are given for work done at SI, we now have four tiers of camperships.

First things first, though. What is a campership? A campership is a discount off of the cost of SI that is given for some of the larger volunteer positions. This is not to be mistaken for workshifts, which are the small, one-time jobs that we ask everyone to sign up for as a service to your community. It is also not to be mistaken for scholarships, which are given to individuals towards their SI costs that are funded by donations and given on a needs-based basis.

Starting this year, the value of a campership will be based on actual costs, rather than a pre-determined amount. Therefore, I cannot tell you actual dollar amounts for 2017 just yet, but I can give you 2016 comparisons to give you an idea.

There are three expenses at Summer Institute:

  1. Housing
  2. Food
  3. Programming

In 2016, the cost per person for these items was, roughly:

  1. Housing without AC in a dorm: $150
  2. Meals (full plan): $160
  3. Programming: $220

And here are the four new campership tiers:

  • Tier 1: most closely comparable to a former “full” campership. A Tier 1 campership is worth the cost of one person’s programming, housing (in a dorm, without AC), and ½ a full meal plan. So in 2016, it would have had a $450 value.
  • Tier 2: worth the cost of programming plus housing (in a dorm, without AC). In 2016 this would have been about $370.
  • Tier 3: most closely comparable to a former “half” campership. Worth the cost of programming, or $220 in 2016.
  • Tier 4: worth half the cost of programming, or $110 in 2016.

The SI planning committees (adult, youth, and young adult) have been evaluating all work for which camperships are given and determining which tiers these jobs will now fall into. The criterion we considered are things like time required year round, time required shortly before SI, opportunities missed at SI, and time required at SI.

Why are we doing this? There a couple of questions here, really. The first is, why do we have camperships at all? The answer to that is that we highly value the work that many, many people put into making SI happen. We also recognize that SI is a vacation for most, so when they are doing a lot of work during it, they are working through their vacation. However, the second part of that question is, why re-evaluate in such a way that some people will, inevitably, receive smaller discounts off of their SI costs? Well, did you know that in 2016, roughly 170 people received camperships? As you can imagine, that is a significant expense, which is borne by all of us.  By taking a close look at what we’re giving out and for what jobs, we will reduce costs for the whole community. One of the major focuses of the SIPC this year, the last several years, and in years to come, is how we can make SI accessible to as many people as possible, while maintaining the high quality we’ve all come to expect. The World Cafe assessments by SI participants made it clear that this needed to be a priority of the SIPC. When you consider that we are each getting a week’s housing for just $150, and a week of morning to night programming for $220, we’re offering quite a deal. But we still have to keep costs in check, and want to make SI accessible for more people.

Finally, we realize that many people rely on their camperships in order to come to SI. We hope that keeping costs down for all will help toward that end. We also want to remind everyone to please apply for scholarships as needed – we want you there! We will also be introducing an application process for some roles that receive campership(s),  to open the opportunity to more people.

Additionally, if you receive a campership for work but would like to donate it to the scholarship fund rather than using it yourself, we’ll be offering a way to do that at registration. If you can give to the scholarship fund, please do. If you need the scholarship fund, please apply. We are all in this together.

As always, SI planning is an ongoing conversation. Some things will work great, others will need to be tweaked from year to year. We welcome your feedback.

In Community,

Gina Phillips, SIPC Chair

 

A Spooky Reminder

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Want to hear something spooky this Halloween season?

The morning seminar and afternoon workshop proposal deadline is creeping, creeping, closer… closer… through the darkest night, on bat’s wings and spider’s legs…

There have been some issues with the links to proposals, however. I apologize for any confusion. The morning seminar application is here: https://uua.wufoo.com/forms/se7o7ay1g17zy5/

And the afternoon workshop application is here: https://uua.wufoo.com/forms/s14o1tb10c9dcdw/

The deadline is frighteningly close, so don’t delay (hint: it’s the day before Halloween).

Gina Phillips, SIPC Chair

Can You Hear Me?

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Do you remember what the pitch man in the Verizon commercials used to say? “Can you hear me?” That’s also what I used to think, before I joined the SIPC. Can they hear me? I would wonder. Are they paying any attention to what I was thinking? Many of you are probably wondering that now. I can tell you, we do listen, we do pay attention, we do hear you. For example, we’ve been looking at the 2016 Summer Institute Survey results. We spent several hours talking about what you had to say, discussing your problems and possible solutions, and considering your suggestions for improvements. We’re not done thinking about it, either. Would you like to know what you said?

There were 105 respondents to our survey, approximately one fifth of the attendees.  Not everybody answered every question. Of those who did, 71.72% were “very satisfied” with Summer Institute, and 21.21% were “somewhat satisfied.” We were, naturally, very happy to see this, but we were more concerned with the 3.03% who were “neutral,” the 2.02% who were “somewhat dissatisfied,” and the 2.02% who were “very dissatisfied.” We paid special attention to those people and their comments, hoping we could fix things.

The major areas of complaint were:

FOOD – A lot of people did not like the food at Stephenson Dining Hall. In fact, 11.54% of people were very dissatisfied. That’s a fairly high percentage.  Reasons for not liking it included complaints about lack of variety, especially in the vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free categories, the fact that they often ran out of bacon, and the general quality.

Someone complained that it was “college food.” They are correct. After all, Oberlin is a college. We’d like the food to be better, and we will be talking to Oberlin during the year about improving it.

HEAT – Yes, it was hot. We offer air conditioned dorm rooms on a first come, first served basis, for a higher charge that is not covered if you have a campership. If you want an air conditioned room, it’s a good idea to register early, and be prepared to pay extra.

As far as the community rooms go, many are air conditioned. A few at First Church aren’t. Last year, we bought and installed air conditioners for some rooms that were up and running. Unfortunately, they were doing some renovations, which meant that we couldn’t always get into the rooms we wanted. Next year, the renovations will be completed, and more rooms will be air conditioned by the church, so we should be cooler for Religious Education.

Another room that was hot was the large room at Wilder where the dance was held. This year, the dance was held in conjunction with the Ice Cream Social and Movie Night, sort of a total entertainment package. If we move the dance, we won’t have the patio for the ice cream or the theatre for the movie.  (By the way, the theatre room was air conditioned. Next year, come on in and sit down.) We liked the way this worked out. If we can come up with a cooler venue, we’ll consider it.

DANCE – Not only was it warm, but several people insisted that we need live music. That’s more a matter of taste than anything else. But there’s a financial consideration as well. We used to have live music because a band attended SI. It no longer does, and hiring a band is much more expensive than hiring a disk jockey. Someone suggested that we offer camperships for people to play, however more camperships raises costs for everyone. We’ll probably be using a DJ for the foreseeable future.

THE PUB – There were a few big complaints about the Pub, ranging from the music being the same night after night to noise competition between groups. The SIPC has formed a sub-committee (or a “Pub-committee”) to come up with solutions to the problems.

And, finally, the biggest area of complaint (except, maybe, for the food) –

THE POOL – Yes, the pool was a problem. It will be an even bigger problem next year, so we’re going to make our own fun alternatives.

As some of you may know, we were not supposed to have access to the pool this year, as plans call for the athletic center to be torn down and rebuilt. Earlier this year, Oberlin informed us that plans have been delayed, and that we would have access to the pool after all. So we planned for it.

Unfortunately, Oberlin has certain policies about the pool, owing to things like insurance and running things smoothly. Lifeguards must be employees of the school, and must have certification in lifeguarding from the same group. (There are at least three out there, including the Red Cross.) We cannot, therefore, bring our own lifeguards in. Liability issues prevent it, and state that the pool must be closed if there are no guards. Unfortunately, the guard hired for our times was seriously ill, and Oberlin had no back-up, as their lifeguards tend to be students, so they’re not around during the summer.

We did add the Slip-n-slide (shout-out to Steve Wagner for the Slip-n-Slide kickball!), and other water games to help with the younger kids. Next year, when the pool is being rebuilt, we are forewarned, and will have things in place to substitute for the lack of swimming. If you have a great idea for an afternoon cool-down activity that you can lead,  please submit a workshop proposal, we’d love to hear it! (submit them here)

There was other feedback and suggestions, too many to summarize. We’ve talked about all of them, and will talk more in the future. We particularly liked the suggestion about assigning a specific time for church pictures. Please don’t think that any of this is decided. We have many months before the 2017 SI, and we will continue to factor the results of the survey into our plans. And not only the survey. You know how to get in touch with us. If you have an idea, or a suggestion, please let us know. We can hear you.

Bruce Kent, SIPC Co-Chair